Ancient Greek Trade

By:Daniel Chen

Trade in ancient Greece is very important. Things can be exchanged, bought, and sold. They trade food, supplies, and a lot if stuff. Trade can make cultural diffusion happen. An example of it is the trading of the pottery. For example if the Greeks traded with the Spain, Spain may try to learn how to make pottery.


GoodsSome of the foods they trade are eel, honey, cheese, meat, and cereal. Traders also trade wine, olive oil, wool, tools, perfume, and pottery. There are many kinds of meat that they trade. For example, goat and sheep are some animals they trade. Olive oil is really important for ancient Greek people. People use it for cooking and they even use it for a bath. Olive oil counts as a symbol of ancient Greek. Wine is also famous in ancient Greece because of yummy vines in Greece. Greeks ship million liters of wine to Gaul every year. Even women trade too. Women traded perfumes, pottery, and tools. Perfumes are used for making people’s body smell better. Also, knife, spoon, and other tools are traded. Pottery was one of the most beautiful thing that Greek had ever trade. People make them into vases, pots, or decoration. They painted stories all over the pottery. The stories are often about myths and legends. They may even paint it as a picture of their normal life. The painted pottery will suddenly be a painting that you can imagine a story of.
oliveharvest.jpg
This is a picture of a ancient Greece pottery of Greeks collecting olives to make olive oil.


Travel By SeaCargo ship was the most common ship used for carrying and transporting goods for trading. Later, a new type of cargo ship was named Haulers. Haulers have low and deep hulls so it was named that way.

ImportWhen Greeks trade, they import goods also. In Egypt, they got slaves to do framing and do work. They also imported wheat to make bread. At Black sea, they have got salt fish and grain for food. Spices, papyrus, textiles, glass, and metal was what Greeks got form Trace. Spices they got was peppers, and the metals they have got was iron, copper, tin, gold, and silver.

Works Cited
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“Ancient Greece.” History of Wine. KnowAllWines.com, 2012. Web. 11 Dec. 2014. <http://wine.gourmetrecipe.com/History_of_Wine_in_Ancient_Greece>.

Cartwright, Mark. “Trade in Ancient Greece.” Ancient History encyclopedia. nf, 18 Jan. 2012. Web. 11 Dec. 2014. <http://www.ancient.eu/article/115/>.

“Economy of Ancient Greece.” Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Wikipdia, 3 Dec. 2014. Web. 8 Dec. 2014. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_ancient_Greece>.

“Harvesting in Ancient Greece.” Olive Oil History. nf, 2010. Web Image. 10 Dec. 2014. ©. <http://www.panos-oliveoil.gr/pages/history.aspx>.
Sonnefeld, Jack. “Ancient Greek Naval Trade.” Triremes (Ancient Greek Ships). nf, nf. Web. 10 Dec. 2014. <http://greekships.weebly.com/trade.html>.

“Trade.” Economy. The Ancient Greek World, 2002. Web. 9 Dec. 2014. <http://www.penn.museum/sites/greek_world/trade.html>.